Courses

CAPP/TBS classes

This listing of CAPP classes is organized according to four major categories of the CAPP curriculum. Each category name is a link to the classes in that category. 

The courses below are listings that we usually offer. Click for current class schedules

NOTE: The TBS curriculum is a subset of the CAPP curriculum.

CAPP Curriculum Categories

Programming Languages

CAPP 30350 Visual Basic Programming (Fall) taught by Don Irmiger
The course will investigate object-oriented data processing concepts using Microsoft's Visual Basic Programming Language. Technology and technique will be combined to explore the object-oriented paradigm. Object-oriented will be compared to traditional procedural paradigms wherever appropriate.

CAPP 30370 Introduction to Web Development (Spring) taught by Erik Runyon
The goal of this course is to provide working experience with the full range of front-end technology needed to produce a modern website. The course will cover Planning, Discovery, Information Architecture, Wireframing, Semantic HTML Markup, CSS Layout and javascript. Emphasis will be placed on building sites that can be viewed on any device using Progressive Enhancement and Responsive Web Design/Development. Some time will be spent covering CMS options and server-side languages but will not be a focus of the course.

CAPP 30390 Programming for video game development (Spring) taught by Michael Villano
The purpose of this course is to provide students with experience in various aspects of programming for video game development.  No prior programming experience is necessary and students will proceed at their own pace. In addition to several programming projects that utilize gaming APIs or frameworks, students will also be exposed to level design (map creation), 3D construction techniques, custom textures, sound design, and lighting effects. 3D game development will utilize the Hammer Editor, part of the Half-Life 2 video game modding Software Development Kit (Source SDK) and its associated tools. Additional third-party (and often free) utilities will also be necessary. Students will work on their own or in teams on a final project agreed upon with the instructor. Students will need to provide their own Windows compatible computer or laptop or a Mac running windows under BootCamp.

CAPP 30391 Script Based Programming 1 (Spring) taught by Patrick Flynn
Description: Introduction to programming. Programming structures suitable for basic and intermediate computation. Elements of computer organization and networking. Development of programming skills including data manipulation, multimedia programming, and networking. Standards for exchange and presentation of data. Comprehensive programming experience using Python.

CAPP 30400 Research Methods in Computer Programming (Spring) taught by Michael Villano
The purpose of this lab-based course is to provide students with hands-on experience in various areas of computer programming. Essential programming topics will be demonstrated and practiced in class, including basic and advanced data types, control structures (conditionals, iteration, etc.), software timing, randomization, and text file manipulation. Examples will be provided in several computer languages that are commonly found in research settings.

CAPP 30550 JavaScript (Fall) taught by Kevin Casault
JavaScript is a popular scripting language used to add dynamic elements that breathe life into boring static Web pages.  JavaScript is designed to work in standard Web browsers and is tightly integrated with HTML. You would be hard pressed to find any popular commercial Web sites that don't use JavaScript to create an interactive user experience.  Join this class and learn how to apply JavaScript in to your own Web projects.

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Technology Applications

CAPP 23507 La Telenovela: History, Culture, Product (Spring) taught by Kevin Barry
The goal of this course is to facilitate student exploration of  the genre of the telenovela. Students will sharpen oral and written language skills through exposure to authentic telenovelas from  Latin America , reading of authentic texts, and through the creation and production of their own telenovela. They will hone their oral and written proficiency and learn the idiosyncrasies of Hispanic culture as they write, direct, act in, tape and edit a telenovela. During this process students will also learn and apply basic videography and non-linear video and audio editing techniques.

CAPP 30521 E-Business Strategies (Spring) taught by Amy Coughlin
E-business employs the use of the Internet and the Web to transact business, creating electronic markets where prices are transparent, markets are global, and trading is highly efficient. E-business has a direct impact on a firm’s relationship with suppliers, customers, competitors, and partners as well as the method it uses to advertise, sell, and use products. In this course, students will analyze the business models and strategies of online companies, explore failed e-business ventures, understand the strategic, financial, marketing, and organizational challenges facing e-business firms, and consider the societal impact of e-business development.

CAPP 30523 Applied Multimedia Technology (Spring) taught by Chris Clark
The goal of this course is to explore ways multimedia can be used to communicate information and solve problems. Students use a variety of tools to complete projects in the areas of audio, image, and video editing, as well as blogging. They also use critical thinking skills to evaluate existing media for content, aesthetics, functionality, and usability. Students typically begin learning skills before class by completing tutorials. Follow-up activities in class then apply the concepts without step-by-step instruction. The course also equips students with strategies for enhancing their skills after the semester ends. 

CAPP 40545 Computers in Psychology Research and Education (PSY) (Fall & Spring) taught by Charles Crowell
This course and its counterpart in Psychology (PSY 20671) is project-oriented. It is not an introductory course on computer applications. Students need to already have (or learn during the semester) the skills needed to complete whatever project is defined. Generally, projects are applications or systems that fit into the broad spectrum of the instructor's interests, which students can determine by consulting the instructor's web page. New projects are defined each semester. Some recent projects have involved:

  1.  Developing a multimedia instructional system on management and coaching including graphics, video and audio files.
  2.  Creating a visual basic application to administer and collect survey data.
  3.  Exploring and comparing the capabilities of online teaching tools.
  4.  Developing a web site for student advising in the Psychology Department.
  5.  Completing a database application in Microsoft Access for tracking and reporting manager coaching sessions.

Students are expected to plan and develop a functional application, which will take as much or more time as other regular three credit courses.

CAPP 40546 Practicum in Robotics (Spring) taught by Charles Crowell and Michael Villano
This course will allow students to work with the Nao humanoid robot platform. Students will learn about how to control the sensory and motor capabilities of the robot to produce specific sequences of robot behaviors and/or to allow the robot to respond to particular inputs from the external environment. Students will work with the instructors to identify the specific behaviors and response sequences to be created. Permission is required.

CAPP 40551 Visual Communication Design 6: Motion  Design (or VCD6: Motion Design) (DESN) (Spring) taught by Andre Murnieks
Exploration of narrative, visual and aural principles to best convey a time-based message through a series of project assignments. Effective use of motion graphics through sketching, storyboarding, kinetic type, animation, narration and soundtracks. Media delivery may include digital signage, web, broadcast and other public venues such as a planetarium. Survey of the technological aspects to motion media including principles of digital animation, video output devices, and planning for application in a space.

CAPP 40553 Music Through Technology (MUS) (Spring) taught by Ken Dye
Music through Technology is a Iecture/lab course open primarily to CAPP majors and musicians, with consideration of other interested students. Lecture topics include the historical evolution of technology in music, surveying the influence that technology had on the music world, from a creative standpoint to the accessibility and distribution of music to the masses. Other examples of technology's influence in music may include the development of multi-track recording on popular music, synthesizer and midi technology, technology's applications for musical composition, and the adaptation of CD and mp3 formats to musical performers. The historical influence of technology Is an illuminating foundation to current developments In the creative processes of music. Lab topics cover an introduction to current music technology including digital audio recording and editing, midi technology (sound and notation), and the digital management and distribution of music. Students will experience all of these technologies on an introductory level, but focus their interests on a technology-based final project to develop and display their acquired skills.

CAPP 40557 Advanced Enterprise Applications (Fall) taught by Patrick Miller
This course will provide experience with a full range of applications which are employed in the 21st century organizations including enterprise business software, smartphone apps, collaborative tools such as Share point, Wiki, Blog sites and tools for integration with Facebook, Twitter and Google tools. The course will also provide understanding of and experience with Cloud Computing and Web Services which are providing a new paradigm for deployment of applications without the traditional data center. The course will focus on how all of these packaged and custom software can be integrated in the modern organization to meet organizational goals.

CAPP 40560 Case Studies in Computing-Based Entrepreneurship (Fall) taught by Kevin Bowyer
The purpose of this course is to Inform, Introduce and (hopefully) Inspire you.  You will become Informed about computing-based entrepreneurship case studies across a wide variety of areas: computer software, computer hardware, healthcare technologies, databases, web services, data analytics and more.  You will also become Informed about different aspects of the entrepreneurship challenge.  You will be Introduced to guest speakers who are, or who have been, principals in developing technology, founding companies, running companies, selecting technologies for venture capital investment, etc.  As a result, you will hopefully be Inspired to consider pursuing computing-based entrepreneurship opportunity.

CAPP 40561 Visual Communication Design 3: Web Design (or VCD3: WebDesign) (Fall) taught by Andre Murnieks
Exploration of on-line  interactive communications for web enabled platforms including desktop and mobile devices. Application of user-centered design principles to hierarchical and I navigational  structures, interface, web typography, imagery, sound, and motion  through a series of exercises and projects. Survey of technological aspects  to web site design,  development and production.

CAPP 40610 Foundations of Business Thinking (Fall) taught by Jeff Sucec
This course is a requirement for TBS students and a highly recommended elective for CAPP and other Arts & Letters majors. It is also cross-listed as a Psychology course. The course is designed to provide an integrated understanding of the foundational business disciplines of accounting, finance, marketing, and management for liberal arts students contemplating a career in business. Leadership skills and business strategy (corporate and small business) is also addressed. A highly interactive format, coupled with multiple approaches for learning, ensures practical exposure to today's business environment and provides students multiple opportunities to excel. Students gain a working Knowledge of the business world, learn a structure for addressing entrepreneurial aspirations, and examine ways to enhance interview skills.

CAPP 40620 Digital Analysis and Forensic Psychology of Cybercrime (Fall &Spring) taught by Mitch Kajzer
The use and interaction with digital devices is a part of daily life.  This course will introduce students to the principles of forensic psychology as they apply to cybercrime offenses along with the field of computer forensics techniques and methodologies.  Topics to be covered include the motivations of hackers, online child offenders, cyber stalkers, and identity thieves along with electronic discovery, Windows forensic analysis procedures, and Macintosh forensic analysis procedures

CAPP 40720  Cybercrime and the Law (Fall &Spring) taught by Eric Tamashasky
Almost all crimes, or even human interactions, contain a digital component.  The fact that "old" laws don't always fit "new" problems is no more apparent than in the area of cybercrimes.  This course will include discussion of topics including: the methodology of typical cyber investigations, the application of the Fourth Amendment to digital evidence, and different types of cyber-specific laws enforced today.  The course will also focus on the responses of both courts and legislators to the ever-evolving issues presented by computer crimes.

CAPP 41541 01 ID: Digital Solid Modeling (Fall) taught by Kevin Phaup
Pre-requisite:  DESN 21201  Co-requisite:  DESN 31212   MATERIALS FEE  This course is an introduction to various digital design techniques and workflows used by industrial designers.  Students will explore design processes integrating digital tablet sketching and computer-aided design (CAD) in order to develop and effectively communicate design concepts.  The course is aimed at students seeking to expand their 3-D visualization skills into a digital medium.  Software introduced will include Autodesk Sketchbook Pro and Solidworks 3-D.  3 credits

CAPP 41542 01  ID: Rapid Prototyping Lab (Fall) taught by K. Phaup/M. Elwell
Co-requisite:  DESN 31209      The Rapid Prototyping evening tutorial sessions will enable students making physical 3D prototypes from digital files that are virtually modeled in the ID: Digital Solid Modeling or ID: Digital 3D courses. Instruction in file preparation and safe machine operation will lead to prototype output from a CNC milling machine, 3D printer and digital laser cutter.  1 credit

CAPP 41562 01 VCD 7: Interaction Design (Fall) taught by Andre Murnieks

Evaluation, design and simulation of user interaction with a computer or product interface. Development of interfaces through wireframes, sketches, renderings, illustrations, modeling and animatic sequences. Exploration of user testing and research methods for generative, participatory and evaluative stages of design.

CAPP 45565 Internships (Spring & Fall)

CAPP 45565-01 Internship
The course description for these two internship sections are different, so make note.
This internship is for UNPAID work with various for-profit civic, public and or private organizations using acquired computer applications knowledge and skills. Credit is given only if work is unpaid and is done in the Information Systems area of an organization.  Typically this internship is completed in the summer.

CAPP 45565-02 CAPP/TBS Community Service Internship
This internship was created to allow an interested CAPP/TBS student to lend their skills and talents to a worthy cause usually involving a non-profit, religious, or campus groups in our local community. Credit is given only if work is unpaid and significantly involves the use of Information technology skills.  This internship might be done locally during the academic year.

CAPP 47567 Special Studies

CAPP 47567-01 Special Studies (Spring & Fall)
This course involves an independent study development or other project that requires completion of a significant body of work combining technology in some way with an academically acceptable content knowledge area or discipline, such as a student’s primary major.  Enrollment in this course requires approval of a  written proposal outlining the specific details of the proposed project.  For guidelines on the required proposal and approval process see Program Policies. CAPP/TBS students only.

CAPP 47567-04 Special Studies (Fall)
The purpose of this course is to provide students with experience in various aspects of video game development including level design, implementation, testing and deployment. The development environment will be the Half-Life 2 video game modding engine and its associated software tools. Additional third-party (and often free) utilities may also be necessary. Students will work on their own or in teams on agreed upon areas of interest.

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Technology-Related Ethics

CAPP 40720  Cybercrime and the Law (Fall &Spring) taught by Eric Tamashasky
Almost all crimes, or even human interactions, contain a digital component.  The fact that "old" laws don't always fit "new" problems is no more apparent than in the area of cybercrimes.  This course will include discussion of topics including: the methodology of typical cyber investigations, the application of the Fourth Amendment to digital evidence, and different types of cyber-specific laws enforced today.  The course will also focus on the responses of both courts and legislators to the ever-evolving issues presented by computer crimes.

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Technology & Society

CAPP 40210 The Internet & Society (Spring) taught by Katie Rose
This course will spend the semester studying the impact the World Wide Web has had on several key areas of our society, including communications, commerce, marketing, productivity, education, collaboration, and our sense of community. It will also evaluate how the Internet continues to change based on society’s evolving needs and desires.  Through a combination of discussion, group presentation, guest lectures, and out of class research, students will be exposed to some of the profound effects this medium has had on our culture. The positive and negative forces brought on by this technology must be recognized and studied if we are to truly embrace the momentous opportunities brought about by the World Wide Web.

CAPP 40260 Information Security (Fall) taught by Michael Chapple
This course provides students with a practical, hands-on exposure to information security topics. Students completing this course will be prepared to address the information security issues facing managers and leaders in any organization. The course is also an excellent starting point for those seeking a career in information security or risk management consulting. Specific objectives include:

  • Gain a working knowledge of basic information security principles and concepts.
  • Understand how information security impacts managers and leaders at all levels of an organization through the use of case studies and classroom discussion.
  • Explore information security in the context of current events including political, financial and cultural topics.
  • Understand the role of ethics and Catholic Social Teaching in the context of information security and privacy

CAPP 40620 Digital Analysis and Forensic Psychology of Cybercrime (Fall &Spring) taught by Mitch Kajzer
The use and interaction with digital devices is a part of daily life.  This course will introduce students to the principles of forensic psychology as they apply to cybercrime offenses along with the field of computer forensics techniques and methodologies.  Topics to be covered include the motivations of hackers, online child offenders, cyber stalkers, and identity thieves along with electronic discovery, Windows forensic analysis procedures, and Macintosh forensic analysis procedures

CAPP 40720  Cybercrime and the Law (Fall &Spring) taught by Eric Tamashasky
Almost all crimes, or even human interactions, contain a digital component.  The fact that "old" laws don't always fit "new" problems is no more apparent than in the area of cybercrimes.  This course will include discussion of topics including: the methodology of typical cyber investigations, the application of the Fourth Amendment to digital evidence, and different types of cyber-specific laws enforced today.  The course will also focus on the responses of both courts and legislators to the ever-evolving issues presented by computer crimes.

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